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ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS OF READERS

IF GOD APPROVED INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC IN PSALMS 150 WOULD HE NOT ALSO
APPROVE IT IN THE CHURCH TODAY?

  1. Musical instruments of Psalm 150 were used to signal times of
worship as the trumpets of Numbers 10 were used as times of movement
for Israel. Adam Clarke in his comments on 2 Chronicles 29:25 stated, 
"Moses had not appointed any musical instruments to be used in the 
divine worship; there was nothing of the kind under the first 
tabernacle. The trumpets or horns then used were not for praise, but
as we used bells, i.e. to give notice to the congregation of what they
were called to perform, &c." (Clarke's Commentary, Volume 2, p.690). 
The trumpets and other instruments were without valves which could 
play a musical scale. These instruments were percussive for marching
or signaling such as drums, cymbals, bells and timpani are used today.

  2. David introduced mechanical instruments of music to worship 
approximately 500 years after the making of the tabernacle. "Moreover
four thousand were porters; and four thousand praised the LORD with 
the instruments which I made, said David, to praise therewith." 
(I Chronicles 23:5). These were instruments such as the sackbut and
flute (Dan. 3:5), and viol (Amos 6:5). Use of David's instruments 
were soundly condemned in Amos 6:1-6. In Amos 5:23    God stated, 
"Take thou away from me the noise of thy songs; for I will not hear
the melody of thy viols." The use of instrumental music in the temple
worship was as actions of  the kings of Israel. God allowed it but 
never approved it (See Hosea 13:11). 

  3. The instruments of Psalms 150 were not employed in the tabernacle
nor the temple proper. In 2 Chronicles 5:12, 13 we read of such a 
temple service. "Also the Levites which were the singers, all of them
of Asaph, of Heman, of Jeduthun, with their sons and their brethren,
being arrayed in white linen, having cymbals and psalteries and harps,
stood at the east end of the altar, and with them the hundred and 
twenty priests sounding with trumpets".  The altar was located outside
of the Holy Place which was a type of the church. The music then was 
in the outer court where the burnt offerings were made. They were on 
the East end of the altar. Therefore they were in the place that 
represents the world. There is where we should leave the instruments
 - in the world of entertainment - not in the worship of the church.





		IS AN INSTRUMENT INHERENT IN PSALLO?

  In I Corinthians Paul stated: "What is it then? I will pray with the
spirit, and I will pray with the understanding also: I will sing 
(psallo) with the spirit, and I will sing (psallo) with the 
understanding also." (I Cor. 14:15). Some have looked up the 
definition of the Greek word "Psallo" which according to Thayer 
means: "To twang the strings of a musical instrument...to play on a
stringed instrument, ..to sing to the music of a harp; in the New 
Testament to sing a hymn, to celebrate the praises of God in song 
(Jas. 5:13), in honor of God. Ephesians 5:19 'Making melody'." 
(Thayer's Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament, page 675).
Then these people have concluded that because it sometimes meant to
play on a stringed instrument that it would be permissible to use 
mechanical instruments of music in our song services in worship today.
However there are five different ways that "Psalloing" may be done:
1) Twang the bow string; 2) twang the carpenter's line; 3) play on
stringed instruments; 4) to sing to the music of a harp; 5) and in 
the New Testament usage to sing and make melody in our hearts. Thayer
the Greek scholar made that very plain in his definitions. 

  1. One cannot "Psallo" without an instrument but the command of the
New Testament is "Speaking to yourselves in psalms (Psalmois) and 
hymns, and spiritual songs, singing and making melody (Psallontes) in
your heart to the Lord" (Eph. 5:19). As N. B. Hardeman said, "I want 
to state to you candidly, I believe that it is impossible to worship 
God acceptably unless there be the accompaniment of the vocal 
expression with that instrument described in God's book - namely, the
making of melody or the striking on the strings or playing upon the
chords of the human heart." (Hardeman - Boswell debate).

  2. Paul did not command the Ephesians to "psallo" or pull the 
hunter's bow. He did not command them to "psallo" or pluck the 
carpenter's line. He did not command them to "psallo" or pluck the 
strings of a harp or strike the chords of an organ. Paul did command 
the Ephesians to sing and "psallo" (meaning to pluck, or make melody)
"with your heart unto the Lord.".(ASV). 

  3. Singing is what Christ and the apostles did as recorded in 
Mat. 26:30. Singing is what Paul did in worship as recorded in 
I Corinthians 14:15. The command to the merry is to sing psalms 
(James 5:13).  In the midst of the church praises are to be sung 
(Heb. 2:12). Not one indication is given that any other instrument was
used in the first century church except that of the voices and the
hearts of the worshippers.


LET US CARRY OUT THE DIVINE COMMAND TO SING PRAISE TO GOD TO THE 
BEST OF OUR ABILITIES. 



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